Supported Site University of Missouri-Columbia: Program Data

PhysTEC Graduates (Years funded 2012-2015)
BaselineProject Funded
Year -2 Year -1 Year 0 Year 1 Year 2
0 0 0 2 0

* Must meet the definition of PhysTEC Secondary Graduate.

** This is a subset of the graduates from all programs, and may be the same.

Commentary on Secondary Graduates data:
We recruit into two active pathways: (i) BS in secondary physics education (including those who choose to complete a dual degree in physics and secondary physics education); and (ii) MS in science education with physics emphasis. To the best of our knowledge, there have been no students with a major or minor in physics who also earned a certification without having completed one of these two degree programs at MU. Therefore, all of the secondary graduates also fit the definition of graduates from pathways with active recruiting.

In 2012-2013, there was one graduate from the BS program, and one from the MS program, both of whom we mentored. In 2013-2014, there were no graduates. However, there are two "5th year seniors" expected to complete their degrees at the end of the Fall semester in 2014. They are included as "future teachers" in the next section.

Future Physics Teachers
BaselineProject
Year -2 2009/10 Year -1 2010/11 Year 0 2011/12 Year 1 2012/13 Year 2 2013/14 Year 3 2014/15
1 2 3 10 16  

* This number should match the number of names entered on the Future Teachers tab in the teacher tracking spreadsheet.

** This is a subset of the Future Teachers from all programs, and may be the same.

Definition of PhysTEC Future Teacher : A student at the University of Missouri who has enrolled in a physics teacher education degree program (B.S. in secondary science education with physics emphasis or M.S. in science education with physics emphasis), or is a physics major who has shown all three of these strong indicators of becoming a future teacher: he/she has (i) communicated an intent to enroll in a post-baccalaureate certification program; (ii) enrolled in coursework related to teaching (e.g. our new "Teaching Physics" course); and (iii) served as a learning assistant at least once.

Commentary on Future Physics Teachers data:
In 2012-2013, our group of ten future physics teachers includes six enrolled in the BS in physics education program, one enrolled in the MS in science education program, and two physics majors with future plans to enroll in the MS program. There were an additional ten students indicating an interest in teaching physics and who would be qualified to start an MU physics education degree program (BS or MS) within the next year or two.

In 2013-2014, our group of 16 future physics teachers includes 13 students who have declared majors in the BS in physics education program, 2 post-baccalaureate students who have begun the MS program in the summer of 2014, and 1 current physics major who has indicated a strong interest in pursuing the MS degree eventually, and who has taken our "Teaching Physics" course, as well as served as a learning assistant every semester (twice at the high school level, and twice in college classes). From the 10 students that were considered "future teachers" in the previous academic year, 2 graduated, and 1 is no longer counted as "future teachers". Meanwhile, we added 9 new students: 2 students were already secondary education majors (and just added physics as their emphasis as of 6/20/14), 4 transferred from other majors, 1 was the entering freshman whom we recruited last AY, 1 was a PhD doctoral candidate who has decided that HS teaching is more appealing than research (he also worked as head TA in the one MU course with LA's in Spring 2-14), and 1 was former physics major who graduated in 2013. These last two have both started the MS certification program in Summer 2014.

Learning Assistants in Physics Courses
BaselineProject
Year -2 2009/10 Year -1 2010/11 Year 0 2011/12 Year 1 2012/13 Year 2 2013/14 Year 3 2014/15
0 0 0 9 16  

Commentary on Learning Assistant data:
In 2012-2013 we had a total of nine learning assistants for the year, and two of them were hired as LA's for both the fall and spring semesters.

In 2013-2014, we hired sixteen individual LA's this year. Of these 16, 8 served only one semester in the high school physics courses (2 in the fall, 6 in the spring), 1 served in both the fall and spring HS courses, 2 served in both the HS (in the fall) and College Physics I (spring) course, and 5 served in only the College Physics I course (spring). All 7 of the LA's in the College Physics I course (1st semester of algebra-based introductory physics) had been LA's in the HS courses previously, either during the 2012-2013 or 2013-2014 academic year.

 PhysTEC Mentors
Project
Year 1 2012/13 Year 2 2013/14 Year 3 2014/15
PhysTEC Mentors (current and prior TIRs) 1 1  
Mentored PhysTEC Graduates 1 1  
Mentored non-PhysTEC Teachers 3 2  

Commentary on Mentors data:
Our Teacher-in-Residence worked with the one new PhysTEC graduate from the BS program this year. The one graduate from the MS program is not counted in the table above; however, she did have significant contact with PhysTEC (the PI helped arranged her initial classroom placement and helped her study for the Praxis).

In 2012-2013 Our Teacher-in-Residence worked with the one new PhysTEC graduate from the BS program this year. The one graduate from the MS program is not counted in the table above; however, she did have significant contact with PhysTEC (the PI helped arranged her initial classroom placement and helped her study for the Praxis).

The three non-PhysTEC mentees listed in 2012-2013 are new physics teachers whom were mentored by the TIR at his school. One of these three was the teacher who replaced him, and she received extensive mentoring support. During the summer of 2013, the TIR taught a three-week professional development program for five ninth grade physics teachers, some of whom are the same four PhysTEC and non-PhysTEC graduates/teachers he worked with during the academic year.

In 2013-2014, the TIR continued to mentor two (non-PhysTEC) local teachers who were new to teaching physics, in addition to the one recent graduate from the MS program.

PHYSICS PEDAGOGY COURSES

Course Number Course Name Semester Credit Hours Primarily for college physics teaching (Y/N) Primarily for secondary physics teaching (Y/N)
3100 Teaching Physics 3 N Y
8110 Physics for High School Teachers 4 N Y
8120 Physics for High School Teachers II 4 N Y
8130 Physics for High School Teachers III 2 Y N

Commentary on Pedagogy Course Data (include a brief description of each course):

Physics 3100: Teaching Physics (3)
Introduces modeling and inquiry methods of teaching about force, motion, energy, electricity and magnetism. Students learn research-based physics teaching methods, including eliciting prior understanding, facilitating conceptual change, and active learning strategies. Prerequisites: Physics 1220 or Physics 2760.

Physics 8110: Physics for High School Teachers I (4)
This is a physics course designed primarily for high school teachers. Topics include motion, forces, Newton's Laws, electricity, and magnetism. The course uses research based pedagogical methods utilizing inquiry, modeling, and hands-on techniques. Prerequisite: instructor's consent. Graded on A/F basis only.

Physics 8120: Physics for High School Teachers II (4)
This is a physics course designed primarily for high school teachers. Topics include applications of Newton's laws, energy, waves, optics, heat, and astronomy. The course uses research based pedogogical methods utilizing inquiry modeling, and hands-on techniques. Prerequisite: instructor's consent. Graded on A/F basis only.

Physics 8130: Physics for High School Teachers III (2)
This is a physics course designed primarily for high school teachers. Topics include modern physics and history of science. The course uses research based pedagogical methods utilizing inquiry, modeling, and hands-on techniques. Prerequisite: instructor's consent. Graded on A/F basis only.

EARLY TEACHING EXPERIENCES IN PHYSICS

Course Number (if applicable) Name of course (or program/ experience) Typical hours per semester Teaching college students (Y/N) Teaching K-12 students (Y/N)
N/A LA program (in high school physics) 60 (50) Y N
N/A LA program (in College Physics I) 100 (75) Y N
ESC_PS 2010; Field ESC_PS 2014 Inquiry into Learning 16 (16) N Y
Course LTC 2040; Field LTC 2044 Service Learning 20 (20) N Y
(LTC 4631 & Field 4634) Teaching Science in Secondary Schools I 24 (24) N Y
(LTC 4641 & Field 4644) Teaching Science in Secondary Schools II 24 (24) N Y
(LTC 4651 & Field 4654) Teaching Science in Secondary Schools III 24 (24) N Y
LTC 4971 Student Internship for Secondary Education ~640 = 16 weeks, full time N Y

Commentary on Early Teaching Experiences in Physics (include a brief description of each):

LA program (in high school physics): LA's are matched with a local physics high school classroom (usually 9th grade, if schedule permits). They attend the same class period every time it meets (e.g. daily or on block schedule), throughout the whole semester. They assist teachers in class, facilitating small group discussions, helping with experiments, and sometimes leading whole class discussions. This program was a new addition of the PhysTEC program.

LA program (in College Physics I): each recitation (<40 students) was led by a graduate TA and an LA, who facilitated small group discussions using a variety of materials (e.g. some Maryland tutorials, some interactive lecture demonstrations, and some more traditional problem-solving). Also, LA's attended lecture to help assist with active learning strategies (clicker questions & subsequent discussions, interactive lecture demonstrations & problem solving). They also held office hours and assisted with formative assessments (both in and out of class). There was no "grading" other than helping with some free-response questions aimed at promoting discussions and follow up during the "lecture" time slot. This program was a new addition of the PhysTEC program.

The remaining courses are all taught by the College of Education. None have been changed significantly as a result of the PhysTEC program. However, we do a better job of coordinating the field placements, as result of PhysTEC creating increased communication between physics and education faculty. Each semester we encourage physics education majors to check with their science education methods instructors to see if they have permission to let the TIR set up the placement with the cooperating high school teacher. In all of the cases that the students have asked, the instructors have allowed the students to be placed by TIR, rather than the College of Education's field coordinator.

Course ESC_PS 2010; Field ESC_PS 2014; 16 hours in a classroom environment
Candidates tutor and work with small groups of students while a teacher/supervisor is in attendance

Course LTC 2040; Field LTC 2044; 20 hours in a Service Learning environment
Candidates serve in community organizations (e.g., Big Brothers Big Sisters; Granny's House)

Teaching Science in Secondary Schools (I, II, and III): These are three sequences of science methods courses taught by the College of Education faculty. In addition to coursework, students are expected to complete approximately 24 hours per semester in "learning labs" or "content specific classrooms" during both semesters of the junior year and the first semester of the senior year.

Student Internship in Secondary Science Teaching:
Candidates complete a 16-week internship in a content specific classroom of their primary certification. If candidates pursue additional middle school certification, then they complete 10 weeks in a secondary school and 6 weeks in a middle school.

K-8 PHYSICAL SCIENCE COURSES

Course number Course name Name of research-based curriculum Enrollments
Year 1 Year 2 Year 3
Physics 2330 Fundamentals of Physics A TIME for Physics First (Meera Chandrasekar) ~130 ~130  

Commentary on K-8 Physical Science Courses data (include a brief description of each course):

Physics 2330: Exploring the Principles of Physics (4)
Course description: A hands-on course covering topics in Matter, Mechanics, Energy, Light, Sound, Electricity and Magnetism. Pedagogy reflects styles used in K - 12 classrooms; emphasis on inquiry, concept development, quantitative applications and technology. Prerequisites: Math 1100/1120 and sophomore standing required. Other comments: This course uses curriculum developed by "A TIME for Physics First", the NSF-MSP sponsored project (PI: Meera Chandrasekhar), and is also currently being revised as we bring in material from a new NSF project, Quality Elementary Science Teaching (QUEST, PI: Deborah Hanuscin). Karen King (PhysTEC PI) teaches this course and is also key personnel on both of these NSF-supported projects. About enrollment: I don't have the exact enrollment numbers, but there are two sections each semester (enrollment capped at 36), and both sections are usually full or close to full.